Seed Starting Time

If you want to grow your own vegetables, now is the time to grab some seeds and start planting. (Actually, it’s a little late on some crops, but not too late.) How do you know when it’s time? I go by the plants outside. When I see the hellebores begin to bloom, it’s time to start asparagus, leeks, onions and celery indoors. They need 10 to 12 weeks to grow before the last frost date. A couple weeks after that, it’s time for the peppers and tomatoes, and the first sowing of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and lettuce.

Old eaves under an overhang make a good place to start peas out of the rain.

When the following plants start to bloom (I’m a little behind this year), it’s time to plant spinach and peas outside. I like to use an old eave by the side of the house to start the first batch of peas. It keeps the seeds out of our incessant rain so they don’t rot and helps protect the seedlings from slugs and birds.

Finally, about mid April, I’ll start the squashes and cucumbers. They grow fast and don’t want to be kept waiting. Outside, it’s time to plant potatoes and more of the cool-weather crops. In mid-May, the beans go into the ground, and the corn follows sometime in the next couple weeks as the weather warms.

Why go to all this trouble? Starting your own seeds gives you more choices of plant varieties and allows you to manage quantities and timing better. It also can save you money on vegetables, although as I said in an earlier post, it’s not a solution to poverty. Avoid most of the expensive gardening products out there and keep things simple. For example, seed starting systems are great, but you can do as well with egg cartons on top of your refrigerator and a couple 40-watt fluorescent shop lights.

For more specific instructions on how to start seeds, here are a couple great sites that also list some other top vegetable gardening blogs:

Veggie Gardener: “The Top 15 Best Vegetable Gardening Blogs”

Vegetable Garden Basics: “My Top 10 Vegetable Gardening Blogs”

And, as I’ve said before, Territorial Seed Company has a wealth of information in its seed catalogue and on its website.

Things look muddy and brown now, but it won’t be long before empty beds and pots will be filled with lettuce and chard and spinach and beans. What’s going into your garden?

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Seed Starting Time

  1. Pingback: Semen…Semilla…Une Graine…In other words, SEEDS! « Fire and Ice Blog

    • Seeds and vegetables wait for no man (or woman). I’m scrambling to get my transplants moved and plant everything that needs planting. It seems we go from winter to everything needs to be done now in an instant. Thanks for stopping by.

  2. Pingback: SPRING HAS SPRUNG!!! « Planting The Seeds

  3. I love your blog. Anyone interested in gardening should check it out. This is my first year planting asparagus, so I’ll be interested in how your seeds turn out. Here in the Northwest, I find the grow lights a necessity. Sun breaks are enough to keep spirits alive until summer, but not enough to prevent spindly plants, even in a south window. Sometimes I want to lie down under the lights with the plants!

  4. I totally agree that you don’t need expensive gardening products to do well! I can even avoid the grow lights since I’m blessed with several south-facing windows. Yay for spring!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s